Steroid related deaths

Drug compounding centers are not regulated by the high standards that drug producers must meet. Most compounding centers are regulated by state agencies and not by the stricter FDA rules that are applied to drug producers. This current outbreak of fungal meningitis, joint infections, and other infections such as epidural abscesses related to products used to treat patients is likely to change this "oversight or regulation" situation. Currently, several high-ranking politicians are demanding stricter regulations be set up for drug-compounding companies. The FDA commissioner, the NECC cofounder, and the director of the Massachusetts Board of Registration in Pharmacy are scheduled to meet with a congressional panel on Nov. 14, 2012. Confidence in compounded drugs can be brought back to the many doctors and patients who need to use them only if such incidences of contaminated drugs from compounding centers are substantially reduced or eliminated.

The New York City medical examiner's office routinely tests for anabolic steroids and illicit drugs such as cocaine and barbiturates, according to spokeswoman Ellen Borakove. But not all medical examiners administer the same toxicology reports. The Hillsborough County (Fla.) medical examiner's report on former major league pitcher Joe Kennedy, who died on Nov. 23 from hypertensive heart disease, included tests for amphetamines, barbiturates, cocaine, marijuana, anti-depressants, painkillers and sedatives, but not for steroids. The Jacksonville medical examiner tested Benedict for barbiturates, cocaine and opiates. Neither Kennedy nor any of the athletes mentioned earlier in this story - with the exception of McGwire - have been linked to steroids.

The fact is that anabolic steroids do present various health risks – they are not without their faults and potential risks, as with anything. However, the context under which they are utilized presents a vast difference in how much of a risk is being taken. Responsible and judicious anabolic steroid use among healthy adult males is a significantly different situation in comparison to anabolic steroid use among children, teenagers, and females. Within the context of healthy adult male anabolic steroid use, the associated and proposed risks plummet by a massive degree, and from what we already know from studies referenced above, the average anabolic steroid user is in fact not teenagers and nor are they athletes, but are healthy adult males in the median age range of 25 – 35 years of age. Other more recent studies have also supported this fact among steroids statistics, where a 2006 study that surveyed 500 anabolic steroid users found that almost 80% of these users were not competitive athletes or bodybuilders but instead average adult physically active males [7] . Furthermore, the majority of anabolic steroid users are short-term users that do not engage in lifetime use (either in cycles or constant use), and that the rate of actual lifetime use among anabolic steroid users was found to be % for males, and % for females5. What this means is that only % and % of all male and female anabolic steroid users respectively will engage in lifetime use (mostly via subsequent cycles), while the rest will only utilize anabolic steroids once or a handful of times during their life.

Steroid related deaths

steroid related deaths

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